Mashco – Piro tribe

The Mashco-Piro or Mascho Piro, also known as the Cujareño people and Nomole, are an indigenous tribe of nomadic hunter-gatherers who inhabit the remote regions of the Amazon rainforest. They live in Manú National Park in the Madre de Dios Region in Peru. They have in the past actively avoided contact with non-native peoples.

mashco-piros

In 1998, estimated their number to be around 100 to 250.This is an increase from the 1976 estimated population of 20 to 100.The Mashco-Piro tribe speaks a dialect of the Piro language. “Mashco” (originally spelled “Maschcos”) is a term which was first used by Padre Biedma in 1687 to refer to the Harakmbut people. It is considered a derogatory term, due to its meaning of “savages” in the Piro language; “Nomole” is the name the people apply to themselves.

Almost all the isolated Indians are nomads, moving across the rainforest according to the seasons in small, extended family groups.In the rainy season, when water levels are high, the tribes, who generally do not use canoes, live away from the rivers deep in the rainforest.During the dry season, however, when water levels are low and beaches form in the river bends they camp on the beaches and fish.

The Mashco-Piro tribe recently started making time-displaced, half-naked guest appearances beside a Peruvian river popular with Western tourists. Nobody knows why the tribe suddenly started showing up at the river, but according to specialists, so far they have mainly shown interest in metal cooking pots and machetes. So we’re going to say it’s either a whole tribe of Iron Chefs, or else they’re melting the stuff down to build some kind of primitive machete-tank.The Mashco-Piro tribe recently started making time-displaced, half-naked guest appearances beside a Peruvian river popular with Western tourists. Nobody knows why the tribe suddenly started showing up at the river, but according to specialists, so far they have mainly shown interest in metal cooking pots and machetes. So we’re going to say it’s either a whole tribe of Iron Chefs, or else they’re melting the stuff down to build some kind of primitive machete-tank.

pnap_aislados_mashcopiro2edit

In 1894, most of the Mashco-Piro tribe was slaughtered by the private army of Carlos Fitzcarrald, in the upper Manú River area. The survivors retreated to the remote forest areas. The sightings of the Mashco-Piro tribe members increased in the 21st century. According to the anthropologist Glenn Shepard, who had an encounter with the Mashco-Piro in 1999, the increased sightings of the tribe could be due to illegal logging in the area and low-flying aircraft associated with oil and gas exploration

In October 2011, the Peru Ministry of Environment released a video of a few Mashco-Piros, taken by some travelers. Gabriella Galli, an Italian visitor to the park, also captured a photograph of the tribe members

In June 2014, seven Mashco-Piros emerged in the village of Simpatia on the Envira River in the state of Acre in Brazil. They met with members of the Ashaninka people who lived there, and sought help in defending themselves following the attacks and murders by outsiders, presumably drug traffickers. They caught respiratory illnesses from the contact, but were treated and recovered.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s